How to listen to Prince’s music LEGALLY online? @CNET tells us how

Source:  @zeeohmara

The shocking news of Prince’s death has fans, new and old, turning to their Spotify, Pandora and Apple Music apps, only to find them barren of his hits. If you don’t feel like driving to your local record store or spending money on iTunes, unfortunately, your options for listening to His Royal Badness are limited.

But you have options. And they’re LEGAL.

prince-purple-rainI am currently listening via SiriusXM Radio app channel 50: The Prince Tribute Channel.

Xiomara from CNET gives us some other ways to listen, including Tidal, which is the exclusive streaming music service with Prince content.

Honor Prince’s legacy, his legend, his mastery. Access the content LEGALLY. He’d want that for ALL artists, BTW. Just a thought. Here’s another thought. Buy a physical copy.

For more on the copyright issues and Prince’s zealous control over his songs, read Why it’s tough to find Prince’s songs online – and other musicians are thankful by Professor Shontavia Johnson.

#RestinPurple #dovescry #supportartists

Peace,

TME

Berklee College of Music explores just what “public performance” means in the age of ubiquitous music in @TheMBJ

“All the world’s a stage,” wrote Shakespeare in As You Like It, and he said as much in other plays. The public performance of creative works, including the work of songwriters, has to be seen in that context today. The advent of the Internet and digital technologies has blurred the lines of demarcation between public and private places, placing an undue burden on those experiencing or performing copyrighted works as to when a particular performance of a work necessitates obtaining a public performance license from the copyright holder.”

Read more: The Music Business Journal, “Copyright in Public Places” by Brian Oliver

London School of Econ & Policy Study Shows File-Sharing HELPS Creative Industries

Source: TorrentFreak.com by Ernesto, Founder & EIC

“The London School of Economics and Political Science has released a new policy brief urging the UK Government to look beyond the lobbying efforts of the entertainment industry when it comes to future copyright policy. According to the report there is ample evidence that file-sharing is helping, rather than hurting the creative industries. The scholars call on the Government to look at more objective data when deciding on future copyright enforcement policies.”

Read the full article Piracy Isn’t Killing the Entertainment Industry, Scholars Say, at TorrentFreak.com