Media Alert: Evans on “After the Blockchain Bubble” Wharton Biz Radio, SiriusXM 132 (12/17 @ Noon-2P)

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Today, Monday, December 17, 2018, Professor Tonya M. Evans will join Wharton Business Radio host, professor and author, Kevin Warbach, for the “After the Blockchain Bubble” episode to discuss the future of blockchain and cryptocurrency.

Professor Evans will discuss her quest to educate educators about blockchain and the exciting future of blockchain in education, including her January launch of the University of New Hampshire School of Law’s online certificate program: Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Law.

UNH Law has been a Top-10 ranked intellectual property (IP) program ever since U.S. News & World Report began ranking IP programs 27 years ago. Now, UNH Law is proud to pioneer the study of the next frontier of IP innovation: blockchain.

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The full power-packed slate of guests includes (in order of appearance): Michael Casey, Jalak Jobanputra, Amber Baldet, Tim Swanson, Caitlin Long, and Marco Santori.

SHOW DESCRIPTION: Cryptocurrency prices have crashed and blockchain applications have not gained traction. What comes next? Will we look back on this time as the end of an overhyped fad, or a speed bump in the development of a major technological revolution? Wharton Professor Kevin Werbach talks with seven experts in a variety of fields all relating to different aspects of blockchain. Together we’ll discuss the future of blockchain and cryptocurrency. Kevin Werbach is the author of “The Blockchain and the New Architecture of Trust” and a Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at the Wharton School.

Tune in. Call in 844-WHARTON.

Air Date: Monday, December 17, 2018 on SiriusXM 132

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Professor Evans travels to Bangkok to discuss IP implications of Blockchain

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Part of a lawyer’s professional competence includes technological competence. Therefore, every lawyer should have a basic understanding of the business and legal implications of the blockchain and its varied and various use cases.

To that end, I will present an overview of blockchain technology, cryptocurrency, and smart contracts at the law offices of Tilleke & Gibbins (Bangkok, Thailand) on January 31, 2018 and at the Annual Meeting of Licensing Executives Society (LES)-Thailand on February 1, 2018.  This presentation is intended to introduce attorneys of all practice areas to the essential information every lawyer should know about this emerging, global technology.

Ready? Set? Disrupt!

Blockchain technology is poised to disrupt law and business on a global scale in ways neither rivaled nor contemplated since the advent of the Internet. This talk will include definitions of key terminology, an explanation of the two most prominent use cases within this ecosystem (cryptocurrency and smart contracts), as well as intellectual property issues, current events, and likely blockchain trends in 2018.

SCOTUS holds that buying copies of books lawfully made overseas & selling in the US is A Okay (for now)

Source: JOLT Digest of Harvard Journal of Law and Technology

Credit: MyArstechnica.com

“The Supreme Court, in Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., held in a 6-3 decision that the “first sale” doctrine applies to copies of copyrighted work lawfully made abroad, reversing the judgment of the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. The case involved the resale in the United States of approximately 600 copies of textbooks that originally had been bought in Thailand at relatively inexpensive prices. On remand, the Supreme Court ordered that the Second Circuit conduct further proceedings consistent with the Court’s opinion.

The unauthorized importation of copyrighted material is barred by § 602 of the Copyright Act of 1976 (17 U.S.C. § 602), and John Wiley & Sons’ (“Wiley”) right to distribute is protected by § 106(3). However, the first sale doctrine of § 109(a) extinguishes the copyright owner’s interest in a particular copy after the first sale to a consumer. At issue in Kirtsaeng was whether § 109(a) applies to goods of “foreign manufacture”—more specifically, whether the phrase “lawfully made under this title” applied to goods like the Asian editions of the Wiley textbooks.”

Read the full article at Jolt.law.harvard.edu