Evans quoted in “The Atlantic” article about lack of fact-checking in pub industry

Searching for Facts vs. Fiction - Magnifying GlassTo verify or not to verify; THAT is the question asked in an insightful and well-written article by Kate Newman titled “Book Publishing, Not Fact-Checking.”

Newman begins the article by stating “[r]eaders might think nonfiction books are the most reliable media sources there are. But accuracy scandals haven’t reformed an industry that faces no big repercussions for errors.”

Newman quoted me in the article to capture my perspective on why manuscripts should be vetted. I described the process I subjected client manuscripts to when I was in full-time practice. 

Newman makes an important and keen observation in her article: “[r]eliance on books creates a weak link in the chain of media accuracy.” she went on to say:

Fact-checking dates back to the founding of Time in 1923, and has a strong tradition at places like Mother Jones and The New Yorker. (The Atlantic checks every article in print.) But it’s becoming less and less common even in the magazine world. Silverman suggests this is in part due to the Internet and the drive for quick content production. “Fact-checkers don’t increase content production,” he said. “Arguably, they slow it.”

What many readers don’t realize is that fact-checking has never been standard practice in the book-publishing world at all.

Read the full article “Book Publishing, Not Fact-Checking” by Kate Newman at TheAtlantic.com.

Professor Evans Presents Paper at 2010 IP Scholars Conference

Today Professor Evans presents her article title “Sampling, Looping and Mashing … Oh My! How Hip Hop is Scratching More Than the Surface of Copyright Law” at the 2010 Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable held at Drake University Law School. This roundtable brings together intellectual property and technology law scholars from around the world to present their works-in-progress. This interdisciplinary roundtable provides academics with a forum for sharing their latest research and an opportunity for peer networking.

More information

Prof Evans chats about IP, Web 2.0 & more on Smart Talk Radio!

I will be on Smart Talk Radio, Tuesday March 17th at 9:00 AM EST talking about intellectual property and technology in the 21st century, and Web 2.0. Tune in to listen, learn and laugh during this informative and informal chat with host Scott Gilbert. This show is a follow-up to a symposium titled  recently held at Widener University School of Law – Harrisburg, hosted by the Widener Law Journal.

The event, held on Feb. 22nd, titled “Internet Expression in the 21st Century: Where Technology and Law Collide” featured four panels throughout the day, focused on topics of privacy, criminal procedure, intellectual property, and ethics. Nearly 75 people attended. Conversation centered on ways new media, like Facebook and Twitter, have woven themselves into the fabric of our lives, and their potential to force changes in legal protections and individual constitutional freedoms.

Tune in to listen and learn about this hot topic in an informal and engaging format.

And if you missed the live airing, click here to listen to the Smart Talk Radio 3/17/2010 recording.